South Africa - Current situation - History

18.08.2015

DAB was adopted as a South African standard by the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) in 2005.

Telecommunications & Postal Services Republic of South Africa published a 'National Integrated ICT Policy Review Report' in March 2015 (see pages 99-100). In the report the panel recommends that:

  • The ICASA decision not to make a determination on the switch off of AM and/or FM signals be endorsed, and that the licensing of DRM and DAB services must be facilitated in parallel.
  • Government, together with other stakeholders, must in the meantime focus on trialling technologies, developing a licensing framework, setting aside spectrum, encouraging take-up of receivers (in motor vehicles and in houses) and actively promoting awareness of the technology.
  • ICASA must establish a standard stipulating that all imported devices should have digital radio receivers.

A licence for a high powered DAB+ trial has been granted to the South African Broadcasting Corporation by the regulator ICASA (the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa). The trial will run from the 3 November 2014 for a period of 12 months, and Sentech will be the signal distributor for the duration of the trial. The licence was applied for by a joint public/commercial radio group – the SADIBA / NAB Digital Radio DAB+ Trial Working Group. The total area covered by the trial is 21,185km2 and the total gross population covered is 10,705, 387 (21.5% of total SA population). It is envisaged that 18 stereo radio channels allowing 40 radio services from the Public, Commercial and Community sectors will participate. 

In July 2013 over 200 radio industry representatives came together at the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) facility in Johannesburg to attend a landmark workshop on the rollout of DAB+ digital radio and to discuss plans for a high-powered DAB+ trial transmission extending from Pretoria to Johannesburg during 2014/2015. The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) indicated that it stands ready to support broadcasting innovation in South Africa, which will be the first country to exploit opportunities for delivery of educational
services via DAB+, as well as services for those with disabilities. Broadcasting radio via DAB+ will also allow ICASA to licence new entrants where FM bandwidth is congested.

01.06.2015

DAB was adopted as a South African standard by the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) in 2005.

Telecommunications & Postal Services Republic of South Africa published a 'National Integrated ICT Policy Review Report' in March 2015 (see pages 99-100). In the report the panel recommends that:

  • The ICASA decision not to make a determination on the switch off of AM and/or FM signals be endorsed, and that the licensing of DRM and DAB services must be facilitated in parallel.
  • Government, together with other stakeholders, must in the meantime focus on trialling technologies, developing a licensing framework, setting aside spectrum, encouraging take-up of receivers (in motor vehicles and in houses) and actively promoting awareness of the technology.
  • ICASA must establish a standard stipulating that all imported devices should have digital radio receivers.

A licence for a high powered DAB+ trial has been granted to the South African Broadcasting Corporation by the regulator ICASA (the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa). The trial will run from the 13th October 2014 for a period of 12 months, and Sentech will be the signal distributor for the duration of the trial. The licence was applied for by a joint public/commercial radio group – the SADIBA / NAB Digital Radio DAB+ Trial Working Group. The total area covered by the trial is 21,185km2 and the total gross population covered is 10,705, 387 (21.5% of total SA population). It is envisaged that 18 stereo radio channels allowing 40 radio services from the Public, Commercial and Community sectors will participate. 

In July 2013 over 200 radio industry representatives came together at the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) facility in Johannesburg to attend a landmark workshop on the rollout of DAB+ digital radio and to discuss plans for a high-powered DAB+ trial transmission extending from Pretoria to Johannesburg during 2014/2015. The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) indicated that it stands ready to support broadcasting innovation in South Africa, which will be the first country to exploit opportunities for delivery of educational
services via DAB+, as well as services for those with disabilities. Broadcasting radio via DAB+ will also allow ICASA to licence new entrants where FM bandwidth is congested.

29.09.2014

A licence for a high powered DAB+ trial has been granted to the South African Broadcasting Corporation by the regulator ICASA (the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa). The trial will run from the 13th October 2014 for a period of 12 months, and Sentech will be the signal distributor for the duration of the trial. The licence was applied for by a joint public/commercial radio group – the SADIBA / NAB Digital Radio DAB+ Trial Working Group. The total area covered by the trial is 21,185km2 and the total gross population covered is 10,705, 387 (21.5% of total SA population). It is envisaged that 18 stereo radio channels allowing 40 radio services from the Public, Commercial and Community sectors will participate. 

In July 2013 over 200 radio industry representatives came together at the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) facility in Johannesburg to attend a landmark workshop on the rollout of DAB+ digital radio and to discuss plans for a high-powered DAB+ trial transmission extending from Pretoria to Johannesburg during 2014/2015. The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) indicated that it stands ready to support broadcasting innovation in South Africa, which will be the first country to exploit opportunities for delivery of educational
services via DAB+, as well as services for those with disabilities. Broadcasting radio via DAB+ will also allow ICASA to licence new entrants where FM bandwidth is congested.